Microsoft Responds to Consumer Reports Survey

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A recent Consumer Reports report has slammed the Microsoft Surface line and removed them from their recommended devices and putting them into the “not recommended” list, stating upwards of a 25% failure rate. Panos Panay has responded with Microsoft’s own statistics and disagreement with Consumer Reports.

This will be an interesting story to follow, seeing both companies bring data to back up each others claims. While I am a Microsoft fan, if something has problems – it has problems. Being a fan of Microsoft, if reliability is a concern, it needs to be called out so it can be remedied and the next model be a higher quality. In the past, Panos has been very receptive to criticism and eager to fix the issues, typically with great results.

This is why today’s Consumer Reports survey is disappointing. While we respect Consumer Reports, we disagree with their findings. Surface has had quite a journey over the last few years, and we’ve learned a lot. In the Surface team we track quality constantly, using metrics that include failure and return rates – both our predicted 1-2-year failure and actual return rates for Surface Pro 4 and Surface Book are significantly lower than 25%. Additionally, we track other indicators of quality such as incidents per unit (IPU), which have improved from generation to generation and are now at record lows of well below 1%.

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New Surface Keyboard for Desktop

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Microsoft looks like they are reading a nice looking Surface keyboard for desktop users according to this recent FCC filing. I’m not sure if I really care for the sterile look, it reminds me a lot of Apple products. Still, for that minimalist office decor, it’s a perfect addition. I’m interested in the way it feels and how well I can type on it vs. a standard keyboard.

This is a picture that they included with the filing. I’m not really sold on it.

 

surfacekeyboard

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Surface 2.0 Announced

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Microsoft and Samsung have unveiled the new Surface 2.0 platform. While it is still aimed at businesses and kiosk use, it still is a great way to showcase new technology. Of course, it lost some of its luster with the release of the Kinect.

“Microsoft continues to innovate in vision-based interaction and software designed for touch. With the introduction of the next generation of Surface, using PixelSense technology, we’ll bring more tables and walls to life with amazing natural experiences for people to enjoy together,” said Panos Panay, general manager, Microsoft Surface. “We partnered with Samsung because of its strengths in LCD technology, hardware design and manufacturing, and worldwide marketing and sales of large-format displays. The companies have built an incredibly successful collaboration that moved from invention to development to manufacturing and sales of a high-quality, industrialized commercial product.”

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